Enter To Win A Pass For To See When Bough Breaks Plus A

Enter To Win A Pass For To See When Bough Breaks Plus A


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An emoticon is a short sequence of keyboard letters and symbols, usually emulating a facial expression, that complements a text message. Alternatively referred to as a smiley face, smiles, wink, or winky, an emoticon is a way of showing an emotion on the Internet and text-based communication such as e-mail, chat, and SMS. Emoticons are letters or symbols used on the keyboard that represent how you’re feeling, for example, 🙂 when your head is turned to the left represents a smiley. The smiley face is often credited as being first suggested by Professor Scott Fahlman on a bulletin board September 19, 1982

You can use our emoticons below :

In Japan, users have worked out emoticons (text-based “smiley faces”) adapted to their culture. According to The New York Times on August 12 1996, the Japanese use emoticons even more than Westerners. Because their PC keyboards handle the two-byte characters of Kanji, users can choose between single- and double-byte versions of certain characters such as underscore characters, allowing a further degree of expression.

You can also use Japanese emojis below :

What is the difference between emoticons and emojis?

Emoticons (from “emotion” plus “icon”) are specifically intended to depict facial expression or body posture as a way of conveying emotion or attitude in e-mail and text messages. They originated as ASCII character combinations such as 🙂 to indicate a smile—and by extension, a joke—and 🙁 to indicate a frown.

In East Asia, a number of more elaborate sequences have been developed, such as (“)(-_-)(“) showing an upset face with hands raised. Over time, many systems began replacing such sequences with images, and also began providing ways to input emoticon images directly, such as a menu or palette. The emoji sets used by Japanese cell phone carriers contain a large number of characters for emoticon images, along with many other non-emoticon emoji.

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