Smiley Dictionary

Smiley Dictionary


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The Original Smiley® Brand : smiley.com Thousands of emoticons and their lifestyle products.A smiley is a sequence of characters on your computer keyboard. If you don’t see it, try tilting your head to the left — the colon is the eyes, the dash represents Language, cryptic language, visual smiley symbols, smileys, text email and chat symbols and abbreviations, kids slangThe emo smiley is often represented as ‘c:’. Emo and scene kids use it to be a cuter smiley face than ‘:-)’, and on occasion, some white girls may use it This chat guide lists more than 1,450 text message and online chat abbreviations to help you translate today’s texting lingo.Smiley Elementary School : Website New immunization requirements for the 2016-2017 school year/SB 277: All incoming Kindergarten and 7 th grade students must have Define enfranchise: to give (someone) the legal right to vote — enfranchise in a sentenceAcronym, Emoticon, Text Message Dictionary, Two way Text Message Translator. Funny text message collection. Popular Smiley,translation and text message fun*fond of someone or something. liking someone or something. (*Typically: be ~; become ~.) I’m fond of chocolate. Mary isn’t fond of me, but I’m fond of her.LOL definition, laughing out loud; laugh out loud: used as a response to something funny or as a follow-up to something said only as a joke. See more.

An emoticon is a short sequence of keyboard letters and symbols, usually emulating a facial expression, that complements a text message. Alternatively referred to as a smiley face, smiles, wink, or winky, an emoticon is a way of showing an emotion on the Internet and text-based communication such as e-mail, chat, and SMS. Emoticons are letters or symbols used on the keyboard that represent how you’re feeling, for example, 🙂 when your head is turned to the left represents a smiley. The smiley face is often credited as being first suggested by Professor Scott Fahlman on a bulletin board September 19, 1982

You can use our emoticons below :

Emoji (絵文字?, Japanese pronunciation: [emodʑi]) are ideograms and smileys used in electronic messages and Web pages. The characters, which are used much like ASCII emoticons or kaomoji, exist in various genres, including facial expressions, common objects, places and types of weather, and animals. Some emoji are very specific to Japanese culture, such as a bowing businessman, a face wearing a face mask, a white flower used to denote “brilliant homework”, or a group of emoji representing popular foods: ramen noodles, dango, onigiri, Japanese curry, and sushi.

Emoji have become increasingly popular since their international inclusion in Apple’s iPhone, which was followed by similar adoption by Android and other mobile operating systems. Apple’s OS X operating system supports emoji as of version 10.7 (Lion). Microsoft added monochrome Unicode emoji coverage to the Segoe UI Symbol system font in Windows 8 and added color emoji in Windows 8.1 via the Segoe UI Emoji font.

Originally meaning pictograph, the word emoji comes from Japanese e (絵, “picture”) + moji (文字, “character”). The apparent resemblance to the English words “emotion” and “emoticon” is just a coincidence. All emoji in body text and tables will be supplied by the default browser (and probably system) emoji font, and may appear different on devices running different operating systems. Separate pictures will appear the same for all viewers.

You can also use Japanese emojis below :

What is the difference between emoticons and emojis?

Emoticons (from “emotion” plus “icon”) are specifically intended to depict facial expression or body posture as a way of conveying emotion or attitude in e-mail and text messages. They originated as ASCII character combinations such as 🙂 to indicate a smile—and by extension, a joke—and 🙁 to indicate a frown.

In East Asia, a number of more elaborate sequences have been developed, such as (“)(-_-)(“) showing an upset face with hands raised. Over time, many systems began replacing such sequences with images, and also began providing ways to input emoticon images directly, such as a menu or palette. The emoji sets used by Japanese cell phone carriers contain a large number of characters for emoticon images, along with many other non-emoticon emoji.

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