Smiley Golfer

Smiley Golfer


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Welcome to our Facebook Smileys gallery! We have a vast array of unique smiley faces to use on Facebook, so you have certainly come to the right website!Michael Hoke Austin (February 17, 1910 – November 23, 2005) was an English-American golf professional and kinesiology expert, specializing in long drives.Visit our fun golf gift shop for novelty, joke and gag golf gifts. View our unique executive and corporate golf gifts and prizes. Enjoy our golf jokesFree emoticons for email. Add free email smileys to all of your messages to friendsA full analysis of 21 different Golfer’s Elbow treatments and exercises: which work to cure your pain; which to avoid; and which are Dangerous!ABOUT. VSGA Staff; Board of Directors > Committees; Bylaws; News; VSGA Grants Program; VSGA Sectional Chairmen; Virginia Golfer Online; History > Past PresidentsStyle, Drive and Courage. Turner Sports reporter Craig Sager has been selected to receive the Jimmy V Perseverance Award at the ESPYS in July. Story »It’s March Madness and everyone is filling out their bracket, so this is a perfect time go run through 64 of our favorite sports cliches, since you will probably be Review adverb suffixes (-ly) and with variants -ways, -wise (sideways); note exceptions (fast, hard, lately, loud).A1 Showplates – Use our plate creator to create your own custom number plates, show plates and bike plates.

An emoticon, etymologically a portmanteau of emotion and icon, is a metacommunicative pictorial representation of a facial expression that, in the absence of body language and prosody, serves to draw a receiver’s attention to the tenor or temper of a sender’s nominal non-verbal communication, changing and improving its usually distinguished as a 3-5 character piece — usually by means of punctuation marks (though it can include numbers and letters) — a person’s feelings or mood, though as emoticons have become more popular, some devices have provided stylized pictures that do not use punctuation.

You can use our emoticons below :


Emoji (絵文字?, Japanese pronunciation: [emodʑi]) are ideograms and smileys used in electronic messages and Web pages. The characters, which are used much like ASCII emoticons or kaomoji, exist in various genres, including facial expressions, common objects, places and types of weather, and animals. Some emoji are very specific to Japanese culture, such as a bowing businessman, a face wearing a face mask, a white flower used to denote “brilliant homework”, or a group of emoji representing popular foods: ramen noodles, dango, onigiri, Japanese curry, and sushi.

Emoji have become increasingly popular since their international inclusion in Apple’s iPhone, which was followed by similar adoption by Android and other mobile operating systems. Apple’s OS X operating system supports emoji as of version 10.7 (Lion). Microsoft added monochrome Unicode emoji coverage to the Segoe UI Symbol system font in Windows 8 and added color emoji in Windows 8.1 via the Segoe UI Emoji font.

Originally meaning pictograph, the word emoji comes from Japanese e (絵, “picture”) + moji (文字, “character”). The apparent resemblance to the English words “emotion” and “emoticon” is just a coincidence. All emoji in body text and tables will be supplied by the default browser (and probably system) emoji font, and may appear different on devices running different operating systems. Separate pictures will appear the same for all viewers.

You can also use Japanese emojis below :

What is the difference between emoticons and emojis?

– emoji are a potentially limitless set of pictorial symbols used for various purposes, including but not limited to expressing emotions, substituting for words, and so on.

– emoticons come in two flavours: text and image. Text emoticons are the original version. Images are a more recent version, and most text emoticons have a pictorial version. Image emoticons are de facto emoji. Specifically, they are the subset of emoji used for expressing emotions. Text emoticons may thus be considered precursors of emoji, which have nonetheless developed in their own way and remain relevant.

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